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Food History

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What Happened To Jell-O Pudding Pops?

During the 1980s, Jello pudding pops were featured freezer treats in millions of American homes. Fudgsicles never really had anything on them. Even in into the 1990s, Jello pudding pops were still going strong. And then, poof, they're gone.

Read on...

Food Science

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Is it OK to Eat Expired Canned Foods? How Long Do They Last?

There are countless shelf stable foods in your pantry. Some of them sit there for years. Maybe you have a can of vegetables in your cabinet that has been there for years. On the bottom is an expiration date. It's expired! Does this mean it is unsafe to eat it?

Read on...

Food History

old-jello-pop-ad.jpg

What Happened To Jell-O Pudding Pops?

During the 1980s, Jello pudding pops were featured freezer treats in millions of American homes. Fudgsicles never really had anything on them. Even in into the 1990s, Jello pudding pops were still going strong. And then, poof, they're gone.

Read on...

Food Science

canned-food-expiration-date.jpg

Is it OK to Eat Expired Canned Foods? How Long Do They Last?

There are countless shelf stable foods in your pantry. Some of them sit there for years. Maybe you have a can of vegetables in your cabinet that has been there for years. On the bottom is an expiration date. It's expired! Does this mean it is unsafe to eat it?

Read on...

The Latest Lore

What does Giving Someone the Cold Shoulder Have to do With Food?

18 Dec 2012 16:55

The idiom, to give someone the cold shoulder, meaning to snub them or treat them with aloofness, has been in use at least since the 1800's.

If you look for lexical clues, you might assume that it has something to do with your own shoulder, and something you would do with your shoulder, as body language, toward another person, as in looking over your shoulder with a disdainful glance, or keeping a shoulder between you and a person you do not like, so that you are treating them "coldly" and thus giving them a "cold shoulder."

Well, you will often find that searching for clues in the actual words an idiom uses will lead you astray.

Giving someone the cold shoulder did not originally, in all probability, have anything to do with body language….

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Origin of the Word Cookie and some Notes on the British and American Biscuit versus Cracker Conundrum

14 Dec 2012 15:07

In my post about the origin of the baker's dozen, I recounted a Dutch folktale from New Amsterdam that tells the story of how Saint Nicholas began the tradition of baker's giving thirteen for a dozen, which we call the baker's dozen. Of course, I also tell the true history of this practice, but the Santa Claus story is much more entertaining, concerning a baker who is taught a lesson about charity (or good will) by Saint Nicholas, who either conjures an old lady to torment the baker, or disguises himself as one. I'm not sure which….

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What is the Origin of the Baker's Dozen?

10 Dec 2012 22:22

Although it is not as widely practiced today as it once was, you can still find bakeries or bagel shops that, as a matter of course, include 13 items (or more) when a dozen are bought. This is the baker's dozen. Why did bakers take to this practice? Are bakers just generally kindhearted types who want to give their patron more than they bargained for? That would be nice, wouldn't it?…

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What is Shortening? It's Not Exactly What You Think

27 Nov 2012 18:17

Most people have been led to believe that the word shortening, in terms of cooking, is synonymous with Crisco shortening or other manufactured products that contain partially hydrogenated vegetable oils. However, although these products are shortenings, they are not the only fats that can be called thus. Butter, margarine, lard, and even some liquid oils can also be considered shortening….

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How Did the Colander Get Its Name?

18 Nov 2012 19:03

A colander is a perforated bowl, made of stainless steel, aluminum, or plastic, that is used to drain the liquid from pasta, vegetables, salad greens, and other foods. The holes in a colander are large, making it unsuitable for anything but draining away excess liquid from food items that are large enough not to pass through the perforations….

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