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High-Altitude Baking Adjustments

Baking at high altitude requires some basic adjustments to ingredients, temperature, and baking time. If you are below 3000 feet in altitude, you do not have to make any adjustments, but any place at or above 3000 feet will require some changes to your baking procedure.

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Approximate Weight to Volume Conversions for Dry Ingredients

There are two primary ways to measure ingredients in the kitchen: by weight and by volume. Bakers prefer to weigh most dry or solid ingredients, as this ensures accuracy and consistency. Weight measurements are more suitable and accurate for dry and solid ingredients, such as flour.

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How Much is a Pinch of Salt or Other Seasonings?

Some people just hate the idea of being inaccurate when cooking. One of the most common inaccurate measurements is a "pinch." You are likely to find a pinch of salt, for example, called for in a recipe.

How much is a pinch in teaspoons?

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How Much Dry Wild Rice Makes How Many Cups Cooked?

Wild rice yields when cooking are not the same as rice.

Also, although not many people know this, there are several types of wild rice you might find in a grocery store, and the cooking time will vary for each of these.

Below is the amount of water to use for specific amounts of wild rice, followed by the approximate cooking times for each type of wild rice: Black, brown, blond, quick (instant), or broken.

Although you are not likely to make most of the specific amounts including here, let alone the huge amounts included, which would be extremely expensive.

We include them for your convenience, just in case.

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How Much is a Knob Of Butter?

In some cookbooks or online recipes, you will be instructed to add a "knob of butter." For instance, maybe the recipe is for a piece of grilled meat and at the end you are told to "put a knob of butter on top." This is something you'll get from English and Irish cooks, and for all I know, Scottish, too. "How much is a knob?" you wonder. The answer is you're being much to exact. Cooking isn't like baking. It is about adding enough.

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My Recipe Calls for Butter in Gram Amounts, But I Only Have Sticks of Butter and No Scale

Some baking recipes call for ingredients to be weighed out. Pastry chefs might be more likely to weigh out ingredients like flour or even butter, because weighing gives more precision.

But most of us cooking at home do not weigh out ingredients. If you have a recipe calling for a certain amount of butter in gram weight, and you only have sticks of butter, what do you do?

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My Recipe Calls for X Amount of Cooked Crumbled Bacon. How Many Slices Do I Need?

Many recipes call for bacon that has been precooked until crispy, and then crumbled or chopped. Since bacon is mostly fat, which will render, or melt off when fried, you need a lot of bacon for a relatively small amount of crumbled bacon.

The following list tells how many slices of bacon you will need to yield various amounts of crumbled bacon in cups.

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My Recipe Calls for an Eggs in Cup Amounts - How Many Eggs?

Although unusual, some recipes that use large amounts of beaten eggs may give egg amounts as cup quantities.

Another problem is when a recipe calls for extra large or even jumbo eggs, but you have small or medium eggs.

Below is the basic yield in cup amount for whole egg, egg whites, and egg yolks, for large eggs.

How many small eggs do you need to replace extra large eggs in a recipe? Egg equivalents are also given below (replacing one size with another).

Also, the number of each size egg that is equivalent to one cup is also provided.

Here is a quick reference for whole eggs and egg white cup equivalents, followed by more detailed information.

  • Number of eggs in a cup: 4 large or X-large, or Jumbo eggs, 5 large or medium eggs, or 6 small eggs
  • Number of egg whites in a cup: 5 jumbo egg whites, 6 X-large, 7 large, 8 medium, or 9 small

This information is repeated below in table format.

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Carrot Weight and Amount in Cups Diced or Sliced

If a recipe calls for 4 cups of chopped carrots, how many pounds of carrots do you need to buy? What about other amounts?

Here is the roundabout figures you need so that you do not end up buying too many, or too few, carrots.

The table includes the approximate yields in chopped cups for different weight amounts of carrots and also the approximate number of large carrots this equals. The purpose of this information is to serve as a buying guide, not to replace actual measurements!

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What Size are Small, Medium and Large Onions and How Much Does Each Yield Chopped?

Recipes often call for one small, medium, or large onion without any indication of the amount in cups of chopped onions these sizes should yield.

For example, if all you have is small onions, how many do you need to equal one large onion?

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