Feed
mobi-logo





Privacy | Contact | Affiliate Disclosure

Like CulinaryLore on Facebook


Follow or Subscribe







Should I Use White or Yellow Onions in My Cooking?

In America, yellow onions, sometimes called Spanish onions, seem to be the most popular for cooking. In fact, many chefs will say to always choose yellow onions over white onions. So, are yellow onions really superior to white onions? The answer is no. If you ask a lot of Latino cooks, in fact, they are going to tell you that they prefer white onions. Mexican cookbooks will usually call for white onions. They are considered a bit milder and less pungent than yellow onions. However, I would be...

What Happened To Sizzlean Bacon?

During the late seventies and eighties, Sizzlean was a popular bacon alternative produced by Swift Co. The breakfast strips were marketed as a healthier alternative to bacon and boasted less fat and less shrinkage than regular pork bacon. Sizzlean was supposedly 50% leaner than pork belly bacon, in fact, although it actually contained 37% fat. And let's be honest, if it didn't, it wouldn't have tasted as good. Most websites on nostalgia or food history tend to paint Sizzlean as one of those ...

Is It True that 90% of Restaurants Fail in Their First Year?

Most restaurants fail. You will hear this claim on restaurant makeover shows and read it in various articles concerning the restaurant business. How many are most? Well, an article on CNBC in March of 2016 which claimed that most restaurants fail seemed to settle at around sixty percent. 1 Most estimates are even higher, and the most common claim is 90%. That is nine out of ten restaurants, folks. Do almost all restaurants fail in their first year? The claim that most restaurants fail in...

Chun King Chow Mein, Sold by an Italian American

While Chinese immigrants were starting Chinese restaurants in the United States during the early part of the 20th century, the potential for mass distribution of ready-prepared Chinese dishes was not readily apparent. One of the first to see it was a man of Italian ancestry. Luigino 'Jeno' Paulucchi started the Chun King corporation during the later 1940's. His first product was canned Chow Mein, using bean sprouts grown locally by Japenese immigrants, and leftover celery trimmings. He patented...

What is a Chitarra Pasta Cutter?

The Italian word chitarra means guitar. So, what is it doing here on Culinary Lore? You certainly cannot cut pasta with a guitar. Well, when you see a chitarra pasta cutter, you'll get the idea. It is a wooden frame (sometimes metal) with wires stretched across it. The wires are used to cut pasta dough into thin square strips called maccheroni alla chitarra, spaghetti alla chitarra or pasta alla chitarra abruzzese. These cutters are especially used in the region of Abruzzo, in central Italy....

What Is A Culinary Torch?

A culinary torch is a small, handheld butane torch typically used to caramelize crème brûlée, to brown baked meringues, roast small peppers, or even to melt cheese. Used anywhere a quick toast is needed or melt, they are sometimes called chef's torches or cooking torches. See Bestselling Culinary Torches at Amazon. You may have seen these mini butane torches being used by other professionals, a smaller version of the tool commonly called a blowtorch. They are used for plumbing, soldering, lab...

Cheese Contains More Than 70% Fat?

Everybody loves cheese! Right? Any food that we love will have its very vocal detractors. One that note, a Facebook meme about cheese caught my eye a while ago and I thought it would provide a good lesson in fake reasonableness. Attributed to Dr. Neal Barnard, this statement says two things about cheese, but only one is pertinent: The typical slice of cheese is 70% fat - that's one step away from Vaseline. It's one of the unhealthiest foods you can eat. But marketers learned a long time ago...

What Is French Dressing?

Dedicated reader Frank W. was kind enough to send me his favorite recipe for French dressing, a Catalina-style French to share with readers. You might like this spicier version of French dressing over the stuff you usually find at salad bars or in bottles. This being CulinaryLore, however, I couldn't resist exploring this whole 'French Dressing' thing. If you've ever had the bright-orange to red and sickly sweet French dressing that comes out of the typical bottle, you may wonder why in the...

What Is Coriander?

The term coriander produces some confusion for novice cooks. Is it an herb or a spice? A plant or a seed? It is all of these. The confusion, however, comes from how we use the term from a culinary standpoint versus a botanical one. Coriander versus Cilantro? Coriander is, technically, the same things as the herb we know as cilantro. In fact, the scientific name for the plant itself is Coriander sativum. Cilantro, as well, is sometimes called Chinese Parsley. The plant is in the Apiaceae or...

What Is Special About Rice for Risotto?

The best rice for risotto is Carnaroli rice. I'll bet you thought I was going to say arborio rice, didn't you? Another contender is Vialone Nano. What they all three of these medium-grained rice varieties have in common is their structure. If you look closely at a grain of arborio or carnaroli, you will see that the outside is translucent and the inside contains a separate opaque area called a pearl. These two layers contain different types of starch. As mentioned in the article about sticky...

What Is Glutinous Rice?

Given the current craze with gluten-free diets, the first thing to know about glutinous rice is that it has nothing to do with gluten and, if you actually do have Celiac, you can safely consume it, as it contains no gluten. In fact, no rice contains gluten. The word glutinous refers to the rice being sticky and gummy. It is also sometimes called waxy rice, sticky rice, or since it has a natural sweetness, sweet rice. This is the kind of rice used in the classic Thai dessert Sticky Rice with...

Origin of Boquet Garni in French Cooking

Although the term 'bouquet garni' did not appear in English until the 19th century, it began to appear in French cuisine during 1600's. A bouquet garni, today, is a bundle or sachet of culinary herbs, usually consisting of parsley, thyme, and bay leaves, with the possible addition of rosemary, sage, and perhaps cloves. A bouquet garni, of course, can vary depending on the dish and the cook. These may be tied together with string or wrapped in cheesecloth. Sometimes, they are even wrapped in...

Curry Powder Has Nothing to do With Indian Cooking

And Perhaps Neither Do Curries I was shopping for groceries online (I order most of my groceries through Peapod) and I came across a newly added product: a Thai red curry sauce. This is one of those pre-made sauces in a pouch that you just add to chicken and/or vegetables to make an instant dish. Of course, I would never buy this, I would just make my own Thai curry which I do quite often (sometimes obsessively). But, being the CulinaryLore guy, I had to read the reviews to see what customers...

What Is Amchur?

Amchur (amchoor, aamchur) is dried unripe mango flesh, used either as slices or as a powder. It is an important spice in India, especially in the Northern states, where most of it is produced. Usually, unripened mangos which have fallen prematurely from the tree are used to make amchur. Mango is a climacteric fruit, which will continue to ripen even after it is picked or has fallen. Buy Amchur Powder Now Like tamarind or anardana, amchur is used as an acidulant or souring agent. It is used...

When Is Recycling Actually Downcycling?

In my article explaining the meanings of plastic recycling codes, I listed the various types of products for which these different types of recycled plastic are used. In other words, I described what happens to the plastic you put in your recycling bins. If you read that article, you will discover that those circular arrows, which seem to indicate a never-ending stream of recycling, again and again, are misleading. Many times, recycled plastic is turned into products that are not themselves...

Is the 'How Coca-Cola Reacts to Stomach Acid' Video Real?

A video on YouTube entitled 'Experiment Pouring Coca Cola in Stomach Acid!! - Epic Reaction!,' or 'How Coke Reacts to Stomach Acid,' between YouTube and Facebook, has been viewed millions of times. Posted by a channel called Molten Science, it purports to show what happens when Coca-Cola comes into contact with stomach acid, or hydrochloric acid. The video starts by showing a square glass containing a small amount of clear liquid with a can of Coke sitting next to it. We cannot tell what the...

Why Use Leftover Rice For Fried Rice?

Fried rice can be a quick and satisfying meal, especially for those who love anything rice. Indeed, if you only equate fried rice with the soy sauce spiked stuff you get from carryout Chinese places, you have the wrong idea, entirely. Fried rice can be a quick and comforting meal you throw together, with nothing but leftovers, or it can be a bit more complex. Either way, it is not complicated to make. One rule you will always hear about making fried rice is to use leftover rice. Many think that...

Substituting Dried Herbs for Fresh Herbs: What Amount?

You may have read that you should never use dried herbs in your cooking. But you do, don't you? What's more, you make tasty food with dried herbs. Sure, in a perfect world we'd always use fresh ingredients. However, depending on the preparation, dried herbs can sometimes be even better. But, what if you have to substitute dried herbs in a recipe calling for fresh? Amount of Dried Herb To Use The rule usually given is to use about half the amount of dried herbs as fresh herbs. However, this...

Never Eat Complimentary Bread At Restaurants?

I have long seen dire warnings against ordering or eating certain restaurant foods. These warnings come in two main varieties. One, the food is gross and dirty in some way and, two: it is a rip-off and of low quality. One of the most often heard examples is complimentary bread. Chefs, restaurant employees, and others say we should never eat it. First, before we even get into whether or not it is true that you should not eat the complimentary bread at restaurants, let's consider potential...

What is the Difference Between Bitters and Amari?

Cocktail bitters such as the well-known angostura and Peychauds are very bitter alcoholic liquids that started out as medicinals but are now used to lend a bitter flavor to cocktails. They are usually too strong and bitter to drink own their own. In other words, they are not potable. For this reason, they can be sold in grocery stores despite their alcohol content. Amaro, however, means bitter in Italian and amari (the plural) are often described as Italian bitters. You won't find any at the...

Follow or Subscribe


© 2017 by Eric Troy and CulinaryLore. All Rights Reserved. Please contact for permissions.