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How To Substitute Evaporated Milk For Regular Milk

Obviously, you can use powdered milk mixed with water to make milk for your recipes. The instructions for doing so are on the box. What if all you have is evaporated milk? How much water do you add to that to make regular milk? Evaporated milk is milk that has had 60% of its water removed. But, you don't have to worry about any confusing conversion formula. Evaporated milk is reconstituted by adding an equal amount of water. You use a 1 to 1 ratio. Evaporated Milk Conversions for Varying...

What Variety Of Peanuts Are Best For Boiling?

Boiled peanuts really are a delicious delicacy. But for those who did not grow up on them, the whole idea is strange and people often find them off-putting. You probably think that boiling peanuts is a peculiar tradition of the Southern United States. Not a lot of people know it, but boiled peanuts are also enjoyed in Asia. The image below shows boiled peanuts from Japan. In fact, most of the world's peanuts are actually grown in India and China. If you are a displaced Southerner and want to...

What Is the Best Way To Store Knives?

I know how I like to store my knives. However, when evaluating your options for storing knives, your priorities and considerations may not be the same as mine. What are the criteria that we may consider? The first and foremost criteria for most of us is probably available space. But, depending on whether or not we have children or how clumsy we are, safety may be a concern. Even so, any good storage option must not damage the knives. How Not to Store Knives Of course, you may ask, what does it...

What Is An Enzyme?

Definition of an Enzyme An enzyme is an organic macromolecule produced by living cells that acts as a catalyst for a biochemical reaction. Most enzymes are composed of protein. Enzymes change the rate of chemical reactions without needing an external energy source and without being changed themselves. One enzyme may be capable of catalyzing a reaction numerous times. Different enzymes act on certain substances and produce specific reactions. Examples of enzymes are digestive, glycolytic,...

Do You Need Living Enzymes from Your Diet to Digest Food?

A claim of raw food diets is that your body has a limited amount of enzymes to digest food and you must get additional enzymes from your diet. One of the claims associated with the raw food movement is that you need the living enzymes in raw foods to help you digest food. And furthermore, you only have a finite amount of enzymes in your body, so these enzymes from raw plant foods become more and more important to your health as you age. Well, first, the enzymes in plants are there for the...

Marsala Chicken Soup

Chicken Marsala is a staple and favorite dish of Italian restaurants which dates back to the 1800's in Italy. It is essentially chicken with marsala wine sauce. At its simplest, it is sauteed chicken with a marsala reduction. More elaborate versions add mushrooms, prosciutto, and other ingredients. It is Italian comfort food at its best. And, what's more comforting than a warm bowl of soup? Marsala is a fortified wine of Marsala, Sicily. The term fortified refers to additional alcohol being...

Bone-In Pork Chops with Mushroom Cream Sauce

I always have bone-in pork chops ready for a quick meal. Although you may be tempted by the seeming convenience of boneless loin chops, if you want the most flavorful, juicy, and tender chops, always go for bone-in, such as a rib chop, the rib-eye steak of pork. These rustic pork chops with flavorful creamy mushroom sauce are quick and easy. You can use white, cremini, or any of your favorite mushrooms. Just keep in mind that the chops are supposed to be the star of this show. I recommend a...

Is It Legal For Restaurants to Not Accept Cash?

I've noticed a lot of restaurants popping up with a peculiar sign in their window: Cashless. Yes, these restaurants will not take cash!. They only accept credit cards. Yet, right on your money, it says legal tender for all debts private and public. Are these cashless restaurants legal? First, though, why in the world would a restaurant not want to take cash? One of the main reasons a restaurant may refuse to accept cash is convenience and safety. No money on the premises means there is no...

Grocery Warehouse with Oxydol Laundry Soap, 1942

In this photo from July 1942, a warehouse worker for a grocery store distribution company is filling an order for a local store in the Washington, D.C. area. Behind him are stacked many boxes marked Oxydol. The box he is carrying on his shoulder appears to be Duz soap. Worker filling order for local store in grocery store distribution warehouse, Washington, D.C., 1942 To download larger copies, visit LOC Worker filling order for local store in grocery store distribution warehouse,...

What Is Spatchcock Chicken?

A spatchcock or spatchcocked chicken is a chicken with the backbone removed and cut so that it will lay flat. This allows the chicken to be spread out or opened up like a book, which makes it cook more quickly and evenly. Spatchcock chickens are perfect for grilling but they can also be broiled or baked quite successfully. You'll have perfectly cooked chicken in much less time. Unlike whole roasted chicken, the breast is less likely to overcook while the thighs reach their optimum temperature. ...

Coconut Water Can Be Used As Human Blood Plasma?

Various Websites Claim that Coconut Water is Identical to Human Blood Plasma and Can be Used as a Substitute in Emergencies Would you be surprised to find out the coconut water was identical to human blood plasma? Of course, you would. What if I told you it could be used as a replacement for blood plasma during absolute emergencies? You would probably be more than a bit dubious. If you are a skeptic, as am I, you would immediately go into research mode. What should stand out in the claims...

Was Ketchup Banned In French Schools?

In 2011, media outfits from the LA Times to Gawker began reporting the curious case of the French war on ketchup. In fact, Gawker chose this as the headline, France Wages War on Ketchup. According to these stories, France, in an effort to protect the integrity of its traditional cuisine and to combat the influence of Americanisms, decided that ketchup should be banned from school cafeterias. Einstein's Beets, a book about food and food aversions throughout history provides a typical...

What are the Parts of a Kitchen Knife?

Guest post by Ben Borchardt Those who are learning to handle a knife in the kitchen, especially culinary students, will come across several common terms related to the different parts of a knife. Although you do not need to know every single part of a knife in order to use one, being familiar with the parts can help you decipher various instructions (and opinions) on knife use. Here are described all the parts of a knife, together with a labeled illustration of a chef's knife. The Edge The...

What Is a Santoku Knife Used For?

Given its exotic-sounding Japanese name, the Santoku (sahn-toh-koo) knife could be taken for an ultra-specific utility knife made for some delicate task the province of a professional chef. In fact, the Santoku is simply a slicing and chopping knife that can be used much like a traditional European (Western) chef's knife. Santoku knives are lightweight and finely balanced. They have no bolster allowing the entire blade to be used. The tip of the blade along the spine tapers sharply...

Hearty Minestrone with Fresh Greens

Italian cookbooks, especially ones concerned with soups, or zuppa (plural zuppe), provide recipe after recipe for minestrona, lest you thought minestrone was one soup. Minestra translates simply into soup, and while minestrone may literally mean 'thick soup' there are as many versions as there are people to make them. Their ingredients depend on the district and the vegetables in season. They generally have lots of vegetables and may include beans, potatoes, squash, and often, cured pork...

Is Arsenic Really Used In Chicken Feed?

Today, arsenic is known to be a dangerous toxin. However, arsenic compounds have been used in medicine for over 200 years. H.W. Thomas, for example, working in the early 1900's, found that Atoxyl (sodium hydrogen 4-aminophenylarsonate) could cure experimental trypanosomiasis. During the 1950's, it was discovered that certain arsenic compounds could affect the growth of broiler chickens, control cecal coccidiosis in poultry, swine, and other domestic animals, as well as promote better feathering...

Does German Chocolate Cake Come from Germany?

German chocolate cake, with extravagant richness, is just the kind of recipe German immigrants would have brought with them to the United States. We wouldn't have a hard time associating such a rich chocolate cake, with its decadent coconut and pecan filling, with Germany. And, in fact, it was German immigrants who settled in the midwest that introduced America to one of its favorite chocolate cakes. Or was it? No, it wasn't. German Chocolate Cake is an American cake. The name actually has...

What is a French Door Refrigerator?

At first glance, a French Door refrigerator looks like a type of refrigerator that has been around since the 1980's, a side-by-side. However, a side-by-side has the refrigerator on one side and the freezer on the other. A French Door refrigerator, instead, combines the side-by-side with a bottom-mount freezer. To understand, let's recap a bit of refrigerator history. The first refrigerators with freezer compartments were called top-mounts. The freezer was a small space up top. In early models,...

The Dirtiest and Most Germy Items at Restaurants

Sometimes the logic of the restaurant industry, and of professional chefs, escapes me. Or, rather, the lack of logic. Should you never eat on on Valentine's day, like Gordon Ramsay says, because it is the busiest restaurant day of the year? Sure, let's all make sure to never eat out on a busy day. Restaurants should embrace the reduction in profits. You may not get the highest quality food and service on the busiest days but, on the other hand, a restaurant's ability to deliver the best...

What is the Difference Between Convection and Induction Cooking?

Convection and induction cooking have nothing to do with one another, but they sound similar enough to cause confusion. The word convection refers to convection ovens, and induction refers to induction cooktops. What is a Convection Oven? A convection oven is an oven that contains a fan, usually in the back of the heating space, that circulates air around the oven interior in order to distribute the heat more rapidly and evenly. The convection oven doesn't actually rely on a different...

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